Free tablet case with Think Tank Photo backpack

Great news from our partners at Think Tank Photo. For the month of February, whenever you order one of Think Tank Photo’s rugged, multifunction, and secure backpacks* they will give you for free your choice of one of their popular AppHouse 8 or AppHouse 10 tablet cases. Think Tank Photo backpacks range from the field-oriented StreetWalker backpacks to their transportation-oriented Airport backpacks, as well as the expandable Shape Shifter and “long glass” backpacks. The AppHouse shoulder/belt-mounted tablet bags are a great way to carry a digital portfolio or presentation, transmit images, or access your music, games, apps and more. And don’t forget, as a friend, whenever you order $50 or more of any Think Tank gear using my special link you can add yet one more free item to your order, as well as free shipping! To receive your free AppHouse tablet case, follow the rebate download instructions on the backpacks’ product pages. [*Note: this special offer does not apply to Perception backpacks.]

Go HERE to make your purchase.

Purchase link http://www.thinktankphoto.com/categories/camera-backpacks.aspx?code=WS-743

Purchase link http://www.thinktankphoto.com/categories/camera-backpacks.aspx?code=WS-743

February and March (partial) Photography Class Schedule

Here is my upcoming February class schedule and a partial listing for March. All classes unless otherwise Click on the class title to go to the registration page (will open in a new window).

Basic Camera Operation (2 hrs)
February 4, 6:30 – 8:30 pm
February 13, 2:00 – 4:00 pm
February 21, 9:00 – 11:00 am

Photo 101 (8 hrs)
January 7 – 28, 6:30 – 8:30 pm
February 3 – 24, 6:30 – 8:30 pm
February 4 – 25, 1:00 – 3:00 pm
March 4 – 25, 6:30 – 8:30 pm

Composition 101 (5 hrs)
January 15 – 29, 6:30 – 8:30 pm

Before You Buy (2 hrs)
February 4, 9:00 – 11:00 am

Before You Buy & Equipment and Accessories Combo (4 hours)
February 4, 9:00 – 11:00 am Before You Buy
February 4, 11:00 am – 1:00 pm Equipment and Accessories

Equipment and Accessories (2 hrs)
February 4, 11:00 am – 1:00 pm

The Exposure Equation (2 hrs)
February 11, 9:00 – 11:00 am
February 13, 9:00 – 11:00 am

Light & the Light Meter (2 hrs)
February 11, 6:30 – 8:30 pm

Your Cost of Doing Business (2 hrs)
February 7, 1:00 – 3:00 pm

Copyright (2 hrs)
February 18, 6:30 – 8:30 pm

Personal Digital Workflow (2 hrs)
February 7, 9:00 – 11:00 am
February 21, 1:00 – 3:00 pm

What’s in Your Camera Bag?

Our camera bag is our mobile office. Especially these days when camera bags have compartments for our laptop, smart pad, smart phone and other devices in addition to our camera gear. Our camera bag can also become our mobile storage facility, accumulating various bits of flotsam and jetsam we add thinking we’re going to use or forget to remove after a shoot. But, sometimes that detritus comes in handy when you least expect it. What odd or unusual thing have you had in your camera bag that unexpectedly came in handy during a shoot?

Here are three lists, starting with unexpectedly useful items, things you might not generally consider but might be useful in certain circumstances, and items you probably should include in your camera bag on a regular basis.

Unexpectedly Useful Items

1. Altoids
2. sewing kit
3. rubber bands
4. mini flashlight/headlamp
5. bandaids
6. hand sanitizer
7. Aspirin/Tylenol/Advil
8. allergy medication
9. makeup brush
10. safety pins
11. Velcro
12. zip ties
13. candy
14. clothes pins
15. baby wipes/wet wipes
16. shower cap
17. tweezers
18. permanent markers
19. squeaker from a dog toy (attention-getter for babies, kids, pets, and adults)
20. scissors (small, collapsible)

And a humorous suggestion

My camera, I hardly use anything else in there and I’m starting to wonder why I drag the damn bag around.

Might Be Useful

1. clear gift wrap tape
2. bug repellent
3. gaffer tape, blue painter’s tape, electrical tape
4. bubbles
5. gray card
6. crochet needle
7. alarm clock
8. hairspray
9. external light meter
10. lint roller
11. squeeze blower
12. GPS
13. sunblock
14. chewing gum
15. Vaseline
16. spring clamps
17. body tape
18. glitter
19. hand warmers

Should Consider as Regular Additions

1. hand towel (for wiping off moisture from lens and camera or sweat from your brow
2. Leatherman or other multi-tool (for various equipment maintenance, cutting/trimming stuff)
3. trash bags (impromptu rain cover, damp clothes/towel storage, quick and dirty flag/gobo, for trash)
4. lens cloth (microfiber) or Lenspen
5. screwdriver/allen wrench/flat wrench for tripod/quick release plate maintenance

Review of the Promote Control remote for digital cameras, Part 1

Promote Control

While technological advances in digital photography have opened up many creative doors, the downside is often the increased need to carry more equipment; laptop, software, external power supplies, cables, etc. If you’re working in a studio, the extra equipment can get in the way but it’s manageable. Once you leave the confines of the studio and readily-available power, things get more problematic.

Promote Systems
, has built a multi-functional remote control for Canon and Nikon cameras that allows the photographer to ditch the laptop and head to the field (or reduce clutter in the studio) to create HDR exposure brackets, time lapse series, Bulb ramping, focus-stacked macros, HDR time lapse, HDR bulb ramping, and HDR focus stacking. The Promote Control also operates as a one-shot remote and has a built-in hyperfocal distance calculator.

The major advantages of the Promote Control are:

1. Multi-functional control in one small, very portable, device (it’s the same size as an iPhone but twice as thick).
2. It’s easy to set up and use. The menu system is straightforward and button operation is clean and precise.
3. Increased functionality for owners of Nikon and Canon cameras limited to 3-exposure auto exposure bracketing for HDR, no intervalometer remote (or on camera), or limited capability remote control.

I’ve used the Promote Control (PC) with my Canon 1D Mk IV and it works great. But, while the PC expands what I can do with my 1D MK IV, it would add significant functionality and abilities to owners of cameras like the Canon Rebel series, 30D, 40D, 50D, 5D MK III, Nikon D40, D50, D60, and other Canon & Nikon models with limited functionality when it comes to HDR bracketing and intervalometer capabilities. Camera bodies with Live View will have more capability using the Promote Control.

Here are some of the features of the Promote Control I’m currently testing and will report on in Part II of my review coming soon:

* Auto exposure bracketing from 2 to 45 exposures for HDR or other uses in 1/3EV – 9.0EV step range between exposures and programmable shutter speeds of 1day10hour to 1/4000+
* Time lapse sequences in exposure intervals from 00:00:01 to 99:99:99 and 1 to infinite number of frames
* Mirror lock-up prior to each exposure for all modes (with optional shutter cable)
* Focus stacking
* HDR focus stacking
* HDR time lapse
* Bulb ramping (for time lapse sequences over changing light conditions such as sunrise/sunset, with optional shutter cable)
* Bulb HDR

Other features are

* One Shot: operates like a regular remote shutter release for making single exposures, except you can change the camera settings (aperture, shutter speed, ISO) using the Promote Control (shutter speed control requires the optional shutter cable)
* Manual Shutter Hold: For single timed exposures in bulb mode using an external timer. There isn’t a built-in timer for this function like in the Canon TC-80N3 or Nikon MC-36 remotes. Operation is a simple click to open the shutter and a second click to close it. I would like to see a timer function added in a future firmware upgrade. As it is now, this would be the least useful feature for me on the Promote Control
* Hyperfocal distance calculator for full-size, 1.3X, 1.5X, 1.6X, and 2X (4/3) sensors plus 6×7, 6×6 and 645 film
* AC power jack for external power
* Capability to receive commands from external remote sensors (noise, light, motion, etc.) and compatible with any sensor capable of triggering a Canon Rebel
* Can use the Promote Control with motorized panoramic heads

What all is included with the Promote Control?

* the unit
* 2 AA batteries
* instruction manual (also available in PDF form online)
* semi-hard carry case
* neck strap
* USB cable for firmware updates
* USB remote cable for your camera model

Optional accessories are the camera-model-specific shutter release cable needed for some operations, a soft case for mounting on a tripod leg (with clear panel for button access), wireless remote sensor, and a remote control hub that allows you to control multiple Promote Controls for things like 3D HDR and 3D time lapse.

The Promote Control is a very useful device and is compact enough to ride in my camera bag or backpack.

** Carry case UPDATE ** I received the new case today and it works great. It’s the same size as the original carry case, but thicker to be able to hold the camera to Promote USB cable and an optional shutter cable. I wasn’t able to fit the Promote to computer USB firmware update cable into the case along with the other two cables, but as previously mentioned, you’re not likely to need to carry the firmware USB cable with you all the time. It will probably ride in your accessory cable bag or laptop bag, anyway.

Stay tuned for future reviews of the specific functions as I compile them. Just a teaser, here’s an example of a focus stack I did of one of my pocket watches:

pocket watch